A Guide to Sumo Wrestling

Sumo wrestling is a traditional Japanese sport that has been around for centuries. It is a unique form of wrestling that involves two wrestlers, or rikishi, battling it out in a circular ring, or dohyo, until one is pushed out of the ring or touches the ground with any part of their body other than the soles of their feet. While sumo may seem simple at first glance, it is a complex and fascinating sport with a rich history, unique traditions, and a strict code of etiquette.

The history of sumo wrestling dates back over a thousand years, and it has evolved over time into the sport we know today. Sumo is deeply rooted in Japanese culture and is considered the country’s national sport. It is steeped in tradition, with many rituals and customs that have been passed down through generations of wrestlers. Sumo is not just a sport, but a way of life for those who practice it, and it is surrounded by a rich culture that is fascinating to explore.

Key Takeaways

  • Sumo wrestling is a traditional Japanese sport that has been around for centuries and is deeply rooted in Japanese culture.
  • Sumo is a complex and fascinating sport with a rich history, unique traditions, and a strict code of etiquette.
  • Sumo is not just a sport, but a way of life for those who practice it, and it is surrounded by a rich culture that is fascinating to explore.

History of Sumo Wrestling

Sumo wrestling is a traditional Japanese sport that dates back to the ancient times. It is believed to have originated from Shinto religious ceremonies, where it was performed to entertain the gods and ensure a bountiful harvest. Over time, it evolved into a competitive sport, with rules and regulations that govern the matches.

During the Edo period in Japan (1603-1868), sumo wrestling became a popular form of entertainment among the common people. It was also during this time that the first professional sumo wrestlers emerged. They were known as rikishi, and they trained in sumo stables called heya, where they lived and practiced together.

The sport of sumo wrestling has a rich history and is steeped in tradition. Many of the customs and rituals associated with sumo have been passed down from generation to generation. For example, before each match, the wrestlers perform a series of rituals, including throwing salt into the ring to purify it and stomping their feet to scare away evil spirits.

Today, sumo wrestling remains a popular sport in Japan, with tournaments held throughout the year. The most prestigious tournament is the Grand Sumo Tournament, which takes place six times a year in Tokyo. The tournament attracts thousands of spectators from all over the world, who come to witness the spectacle of these giant wrestlers battling it out in the ring.

The Sumo Ring: Dohyo

Sumo wrestling is a sport that takes place on a raised ring called a dohyo. The dohyo is a circular area, 4.55 meters wide, made of rice-straw bales and mounted on a square clay platform. The ring is traditionally made of clay and rice straw bales, and the kanji characters for dohyo (土俵) literally translate as clay and rice straw bales. In official professional tournaments (honbasho), the dohyo is mounted on a square platform of clay 66 cm high and 6.7m wide on each side.

The dohyo is an elevated ring, which is considered sacred and is only used for sumo wrestling. The elevated ring is meant to symbolize the separation of the sumo wrestlers from the rest of the world. The ring is surrounded by a ridge of clay, which is intended to keep the wrestlers from falling off the ring.

The Sumo Dohyō has a diameter of 14.93′ (4.55 m) and an overall area of 175 ft² (16.26 m²). There are two white lines, Shikiri lines, at the center of the ring to designate where the combatants position themselves behind these lines at the start of the bout. The ring is considered sacred and is only used for sumo wrestling. The elevated ring is meant to symbolize the separation of the sumo wrestlers from the rest of the world.

In a sumo wrestling bout, the objective is simple: push or throw your opponent out of the ring or force them to touch the ground with any part of their body other than their feet. The sumo wrestlers are dressed in a mawashi, which is a loincloth made of silk or cotton. The wrestlers are barefoot, and they use their hands, arms, and upper body to push, pull, and throw their opponent out of the ring.

In conclusion, the dohyo is an essential part of sumo wrestling, and it is considered sacred. The elevated ring is meant to symbolize the separation of the sumo wrestlers from the rest of the world. The dohyo is a circular area, 4.55 meters wide, made of rice-straw bales and mounted on a square clay platform. The ring is surrounded by a ridge of clay, which is intended to keep the wrestlers from falling off the ring. The objective in a sumo wrestling bout is to push or throw your opponent out of the ring or force them to touch the ground with any part of their body other than their feet.

Sumo Wrestling Attire: Mawashi

Sumo wrestling is a traditional Japanese sport that requires a unique set of attire. The most recognizable and essential part of a sumo wrestler’s outfit is the mawashi, a type of loincloth. The mawashi is made of a thick cotton material and is wrapped around the wrestler’s waist, extending to the middle of the thigh. It is secured at the waist by a thick cord, which is tied in a specific way to ensure a secure fit.

For top-ranked professional sumo wrestlers, the mawashi is made of silk and comes in a variety of colours. It is approximately 30 feet (9.1 m) in length when unwrapped, about two feet wide, and weighs about 8 to 11 lb (3.6 to 5.0 kg). The silk mawashi is more expensive and is only worn during tournaments or special events.

The mawashi is not just a practical garment but is also a symbol of the sumo wrestler’s status and identity. Each wrestler has their own unique mawashi, which is often decorated with their name or emblem. The mawashi is also an essential part of the ring entry ceremony or dohyō-iri, where the wrestlers enter the ring to perform a ritual dance before a match.

Opposing wrestlers use various maneuvers to grab and hold onto the mawashi to gain an advantage during matches. Therefore, the mawashi must be tightly wrapped and secured to prevent it from coming loose during a match. Sumo wrestlers spend a considerable amount of time learning how to tie their mawashi correctly and securely.

In conclusion, the mawashi is an essential part of sumo wrestling attire and plays a crucial role in the sport. It is not just a practical garment but also a symbol of the wrestler’s identity and status. Sumo wrestlers take great care in tying their mawashi securely to prevent it from coming loose during matches.

Ranking System in Sumo

Sumo wrestling is a sport that is steeped in tradition and has a unique ranking system that sets it apart from other sports. The ranking system in sumo is based on a wrestler’s performance in tournaments, and it is used to determine their position in the banzuke, which is the official ranking list.

The highest rank in sumo is Yokozuna, and only a select few wrestlers have ever achieved this rank. Yokozuna wrestlers are considered to be the best in the sport, and they are known for their power, skill, and dignity. They wear a ceremonial rope called a tsuna around their waist when they enter the ring.

The second-highest rank in sumo is Ozeki, and wrestlers who achieve this rank are also considered to be among the best in the sport. Ozeki wrestlers are known for their strength and technique, and they are often seen as potential future Yokozuna.

Below Ozeki, there are three ranks: Sekiwake, Komusubi, and Maegashira. These ranks are reserved for wrestlers who have performed well in tournaments but have not yet reached the higher ranks. Sekiwake is the highest of these ranks, followed by Komusubi and Maegashira.

In the top division of sumo, known as Makuuchi, there are 42 wrestlers spread across five ranks: Yokozuna, Ozeki, Sekiwake, Komusubi, and Maegashira. Below Makuuchi, there are six lower divisions, each with their own ranking system.

The banzuke is updated before each tournament, and wrestlers are ranked based on their performance in the previous tournament. Wrestlers who perform well are promoted to higher ranks, while those who perform poorly may be demoted to lower ranks.

Overall, the ranking system in sumo is a unique and fascinating aspect of the sport. It rewards wrestlers who perform well in tournaments and ensures that the best wrestlers are always at the top of the banzuke.

Sumo Wrestling Techniques

Sumo wrestling is a sport that requires a combination of strength, technique, and agility. In this section, we will explore some of the most important techniques used in sumo wrestling.

Moves

There are many different moves that sumo wrestlers use to gain an advantage over their opponents. Some of the most common moves include:

  • Tachi-ai: This is the initial charge at the beginning of a bout. Wrestlers will try to gain the upper hand by pushing or pulling their opponent off balance.
  • Tsuki: This is a thrusting move where a wrestler uses their palm to push their opponent away.
  • Yori-kiri: This is a pushing move where a wrestler uses their body weight to force their opponent out of the ring.
  • Oshi-dashi: This is a pushing move where a wrestler uses their palm to push their opponent out of the ring.
  • Hiki-otoshi: This is a pulling move where a wrestler uses their body weight to pull their opponent off balance and out of the ring.

Technique

In addition to moves, sumo wrestlers also use various techniques to gain an advantage over their opponents. Some of the most important techniques include:

  • Mawashi: This is the traditional loincloth worn by sumo wrestlers. Wrestlers will use the mawashi to gain a grip on their opponent and control their movements.
  • Ashitori: This is a technique where a wrestler uses their foot to trip their opponent and knock them off balance.
  • Kotenage: This is a technique where a wrestler uses their arm to throw their opponent to the ground.
  • Uwatenage: This is a technique where a wrestler uses their arm to throw their opponent over their shoulder.

Agility

Agility is also an important factor in sumo wrestling. Wrestlers need to be able to move quickly and change direction in order to avoid their opponent’s attacks and gain an advantage. Some of the most important agility drills for sumo wrestlers include:

  • Shiko: This is a squatting exercise where a wrestler lifts their leg and slams it down to the ground. This helps to build leg strength and improve balance.
  • Tsuppari: This is a drill where a wrestler practices their thrusting technique by hitting a punching bag or a padded wall.
  • Suri-ashi: This is a sliding exercise where a wrestler practices moving quickly and changing direction by sliding their feet along the ground.

Overall, sumo wrestling requires a combination of strength, technique, and agility. By mastering these techniques and drills, sumo wrestlers can gain an advantage over their opponents and achieve success in the ring.

Sumo Tournaments

Sumo tournaments in Japan are the most important events for sumo wrestling. These tournaments are also known as basho and are held six times a year. The tournaments last for 15 days, with each wrestler competing in one match per day. The winner of the tournament is determined by the wrestler with the most wins. If there is a tie, a playoff match is held to determine the winner.

The dates and venues for the sumo tournaments are announced well in advance, and it is important to plan accordingly if you want to attend one. Three of the tournaments are always held in the Tokyo Ryogoku Kokugikan National Sumo Arena in Tokyo’s Ryogoku district, which is considered the official sumo town. The other tournaments are held in other cities such as Osaka, Nagoya, and Fukuoka.

During the tournament, wrestlers are divided into two groups, East and West, and compete against each other. The wrestler with the most wins in each group will then compete against each other on the final day of the tournament to determine the overall winner.

The winner of the tournament is awarded the Emperor’s Cup, and it is considered the highest honour in sumo wrestling. The winner is also promoted to a higher rank in the sumo hierarchy.

Attending a sumo tournament is a unique experience, and it is worth planning your trip to Japan around one of these events. The atmosphere is electric, and the matches are intense and exciting to watch.

Sumo Stables: Heya

Sumo stables, also known as heya, are the training quarters where sumo wrestlers live and train. All professional sumo wrestlers must belong to a heya. In Japan, there are currently 44 heya, each with its unique style and traditions.

The life of a sumo wrestler in a heya is highly regimented. They wake up early in the morning and begin their day with training, followed by meals and rest periods. The wrestlers live together in communal dormitories and follow strict rules and customs.

Each heya is led by a stablemaster, or oyakata, who is a retired sumo wrestler. The oyakata is responsible for the training and development of the wrestlers under his care. The wrestlers in a heya are divided into different ranks based on their ability and experience. The highest rank is yokozuna, followed by ozeki, sekiwake, komusubi, and maegashira.

Visitors to Japan can visit a sumo stable and observe the wrestlers’ morning training sessions. However, visitors must follow strict rules and etiquette when visiting a heya. For example, they must be quiet and respectful during training and refrain from taking photographs without permission.

In conclusion, sumo stables, or heya, are an integral part of the sumo wrestling world. They provide a structured environment for sumo wrestlers to train and develop their skills. Visitors to Japan can experience this unique aspect of Japanese culture by visiting a sumo stable and observing the wrestlers’ morning training sessions.

Sumo Wrestlers: Rikishi

Sumo wrestling is a traditional Japanese sport that has been around for centuries. Sumo wrestlers, also known as rikishi, are the athletes who compete in this sport. They are known for their unique physique and wrestling style, which has been developed over many years of training and practice.

Professional sumo wrestlers in Japan are divided into two categories: junior wrestlers and senior wrestlers. Junior wrestlers are known as makushita and compete in lower divisions, while senior wrestlers are known as sekitori and compete in the top divisions.

To become a sumo wrestler, athletes must undergo rigorous training, including a strict diet and exercise regimen. They must also learn the various techniques and strategies used in sumo wrestling, such as pushing, throwing, and grappling.

Sumo wrestlers must also adhere to a strict code of conduct both in and out of the ring. They are expected to maintain a high level of respect and discipline, as well as follow traditional customs and practices.

Despite the challenges and demands of being a sumo wrestler, it is a highly respected profession in Japan. Sumo wrestlers are admired for their strength, skill, and dedication to the sport. They are also seen as cultural icons, representing the rich history and traditions of Japan.

Training and Lifestyle of Sumo Wrestlers

Sumo wrestling is not just a sport but a way of life for its wrestlers, known as rikishi. To become a successful sumo wrestler, one must undergo rigorous training and adopt a unique lifestyle.

Training for sumo wrestlers is intense and demanding, with wrestlers practicing for several hours a day, six days a week. Practice sessions include a combination of physical exercises, such as running, weightlifting, and endurance training, as well as sumo-specific techniques and drills.

Morning training, known as asa-geiko, is a particularly important part of a sumo wrestler’s routine. Wrestlers wake up early in the morning to train on an empty stomach, which helps with weight loss and endurance. Asa-geiko sessions usually last for two to three hours and involve a combination of physical and technical training.

One of the most distinctive aspects of sumo wrestling is the emphasis on weight gain. Sumo wrestlers are expected to be large and powerful, with some wrestlers weighing over 400 pounds. To gain weight, wrestlers follow a strict diet that is high in protein and carbohydrates. They also consume a traditional Japanese stew called chanko-nabe, which is a high-calorie dish that helps with weight gain.

In addition to training and diet, sumo wrestlers must also perform daily chores as part of their lifestyle. These chores include cleaning the sumo stable, cooking meals, and running errands for senior wrestlers. This tradition of performing chores is believed to instill discipline and humility in wrestlers and is an essential part of their training.

Overall, sumo wrestling requires a high level of dedication and discipline from its wrestlers. By adopting a unique lifestyle that emphasises physical training, weight gain, and daily chores, sumo wrestlers are able to become some of the most powerful and respected athletes in Japan.

Sumo Wrestling Etiquette

Sumo wrestling is not just about brute strength and force. It is a sport that is steeped in tradition and culture, and the etiquette surrounding it is just as important as the actual wrestling itself. Here are a few key points to keep in mind when it comes to sumo wrestling etiquette:

Ring Entering Ceremonies

Before the actual wrestling begins, there are a series of ring entering ceremonies that take place. These ceremonies are designed to show respect for the sport, the wrestlers, and the audience. Here are a few things to keep in mind during the ring entering ceremonies:

  • Wrestlers enter the ring from the east and west sides, and they perform a series of rituals before the actual wrestling begins.
  • Before entering the ring, wrestlers will throw salt onto the ground to purify the ring and ward off evil spirits.
  • Wrestlers will then perform a series of stomps and slaps to get themselves psyched up for the match.
  • Once both wrestlers are in the ring, they will perform a final bow to show respect for each other and the sport.

Etiquette

In addition to the ring entering ceremonies, there are a few other key points of etiquette to keep in mind when it comes to sumo wrestling:

  • It is important to show respect for the wrestlers at all times. This means refraining from shouting or heckling during the match.
  • If you are watching a match in person, it is customary to sit cross-legged on the floor rather than in a chair.
  • It is also important to dress appropriately when attending a sumo match. This means avoiding revealing clothing and wearing conservative, respectful attire.
  • Finally, it is important to remember that sumo wrestling is a sport that is steeped in tradition and culture. Showing respect for that tradition and culture is just as important as showing respect for the wrestlers themselves.

Sumo and Religion

Sumo wrestling has deep roots in Japanese religion and culture. It is said to have originated as a form of entertainment for the gods of Japan’s Shinto religion. Many of the rituals and traditions associated with sumo have religious significance, such as the symbolic purification of the ring with salt before each match.

In the past, sumo wrestlers were considered sacred and were believed to possess divine power. They were often called upon to perform religious rituals and were thought to have the ability to ward off evil spirits. Today, sumo wrestlers still hold a special place in Japanese society and are highly respected for their physical prowess and dedication to the sport.

The connection between sumo and religion can also be seen in the way that sumo tournaments are held. Each tournament begins with a ceremony in which the wrestlers perform a series of rituals, including the throwing of salt and the stomping of their feet. These rituals are meant to purify the ring and to show respect for the gods.

Overall, sumo wrestling is deeply intertwined with Japanese religion and culture. It is a sport that has evolved over time, but has never lost its connection to its sacred roots.

Sumo Wrestling in Tokyo

Tokyo is the hub of sumo wrestling in Japan, and it hosts three of the six annual sumo tournaments. The tournaments take place in January, May, and September at the Ryogoku Kokugikan, also known as the national sumo stadium. The Ryogoku district in Tokyo is the heart of sumo wrestling, and it is where most of the sumo stables and wrestlers are located.

The Ryogoku Kokugikan is a massive indoor arena that can seat up to 11,000 people. The stadium is designed in a traditional Japanese style and is equipped with modern facilities. The stadium has a museum that showcases the history of sumo wrestling, and visitors can learn about the sport’s traditions and rituals.

During the sumo tournaments, the stadium is packed with spectators who come to watch the wrestlers compete. The tournaments last for 15 days, and each day, wrestlers from different stables compete against each other. The wrestlers are ranked based on their performance, and the top-ranked wrestlers compete in the final matches.

Getting tickets for the sumo tournaments in Tokyo can be a challenge, especially for the popular days. It is recommended to buy tickets in advance, either online or at the stadium box office. There are different ticket categories, and the prices vary depending on the seats’ location. The cheapest tickets are the standing tickets, which allow visitors to watch the matches while standing in a designated area.

In addition to the sumo tournaments, visitors can also watch the wrestlers train at the sumo stables in the Ryogoku district. The training sessions take place early in the morning, and visitors need to make reservations in advance to attend. Watching the wrestlers train is an excellent opportunity to learn about the sport and see the wrestlers’ dedication and discipline.

Overall, sumo wrestling in Tokyo is a unique experience that visitors should not miss. The sport is deeply rooted in Japanese culture and traditions, and watching the matches and training sessions can offer a glimpse into the world of sumo wrestling.

Sumo Wrestling Tickets and Seating

Sumo wrestling is a popular sport in Japan, and people from all over the world come to watch the tournaments. Getting tickets for a sumo wrestling match can be a bit challenging, especially during the peak season. However, with some planning and preparation, it is possible to secure tickets to watch the matches.

Buying Sumo Wrestling Tickets

Tickets for sumo wrestling matches usually go on sale at least a month in advance. The best way to buy tickets for a sumo wrestling match is to purchase them online or at a Pia store in Tokyo. It is also possible to buy tickets at the venue on the day of the match, but there is a risk that they may be sold out.

Types of Sumo Wrestling Seats

There are different types of seats available for sumo wrestling matches, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Here are the most common types of seats:

  • Ringside seats: These seats are the closest to the ring and offer an up-close and personal view of the matches. However, they are also the most expensive seats.
  • Box seats: These seats are located on the second floor and offer a good view of the matches. They are usually sold in groups of four or six and are a good option for families or groups of friends.
  • Balcony seats: These seats are located on the third floor and offer a bird’s eye view of the matches. They are the cheapest seats but may not offer the best view.

Sumo Wrestling Ticket Prices

The price of sumo wrestling tickets varies depending on the type of seat and the tournament. Ringside seats are the most expensive, with prices ranging from ¥30,000 to ¥90,000. Box seats are cheaper, with prices ranging from ¥20,000 to ¥50,000. Balcony seats are the cheapest, with prices ranging from ¥3,800 to ¥10,000.

Sold Out Sumo Wrestling Tickets

Sumo wrestling matches are popular, and tickets can sell out quickly, especially during the peak season. If tickets are sold out, it is still possible to get same-day tickets at the venue. However, same-day tickets are limited, and there is no guarantee that they will be available.

In conclusion, getting tickets for a sumo wrestling match requires some planning and preparation. It is best to buy tickets in advance and choose the type of seat that suits your budget and preference. By following these tips, you can enjoy an unforgettable experience watching the ancient Japanese sport of sumo wrestling.

Japan Sumo Association

The Japan Sumo Association (JSA) is the governing body that oversees the sport of sumo wrestling in Japan. It was established in 1925 and is responsible for organizing and regulating professional sumo tournaments, as well as managing the training and development of sumo wrestlers.

The JSA is comprised of a board of directors, which includes retired sumo wrestlers and other prominent members of the sumo community. The board is responsible for making decisions related to the sport, such as setting the rules for matches and determining the rankings of wrestlers.

One of the key roles of the JSA is to organize the six annual professional sumo tournaments, known as honbasho. These tournaments are held in different cities throughout Japan and attract large crowds of spectators. The JSA also oversees the training and development of sumo wrestlers, including providing financial support and facilities for training.

In recent years, the JSA has faced criticism and controversy over issues such as allegations of match-fixing and hazing of young wrestlers. The organization has taken steps to address these issues, such as implementing new rules and regulations to improve transparency and accountability.

Despite these challenges, the JSA remains a central figure in the world of sumo wrestling, and its decisions and actions have a significant impact on the sport as a whole.

Chanko-Nabe: The Sumo Diet

Chanko-Nabe is a hot pot dish that is the staple of the sumo wrestler’s diet. It is a hearty and nutritious meal that is designed to help the wrestlers put on weight and build muscle mass. The dish is made up of a variety of ingredients, including seafood, pork, tofu, and vegetables, all cooked in a rich broth.

The dish is traditionally eaten by sumo wrestlers in Japan and is usually served in massive quantities as part of a weight-gain diet for sumo wrestlers. They eat this meal pretty regularly with different ingredients. The characteristic of this hot pot is that there is no specific recipe. Each sumo stable has its own recipe, and the dish is often prepared with the ingredients that are available locally.

The broth for Chanko-Nabe is usually made with chicken or fish stock, and it is flavoured with soy sauce, sake, and mirin. The broth is then simmered for several hours to allow the flavours to meld together and create a rich, savoury flavour.

The ingredients for Chanko-Nabe are typically arranged in a large pot in the centre of the table, and the diners help themselves to the ingredients as they cook. The dish is often served with rice, and diners are encouraged to eat as much as they can to help them put on weight.

Chanko-Nabe is a nutritious and filling meal that is perfect for anyone looking to put on weight or build muscle mass. It is also a great way to enjoy a hearty and delicious meal with friends and family.

Sumo Wrestling Outside Japan

While sumo wrestling is Japan’s national sport, it has also gained popularity in other countries. In recent years, many wrestlers from outside Japan have entered the sport and achieved great success.

One of the most notable examples is Mongolia, which has produced several top-ranked sumo wrestlers. Mongolian wrestlers have won multiple championships and have become some of the biggest stars in the sport. Their success has led to a surge in popularity of sumo wrestling in Mongolia, with many young people aspiring to become sumo wrestlers themselves.

Other countries where sumo wrestling has gained popularity include the United States, Canada, and Russia. In these countries, sumo wrestling is often practiced as a form of martial arts or as a competitive sport. While the rules and traditions of sumo wrestling are largely the same, there may be some variations in the way the sport is practiced outside of Japan.

Despite its growing popularity, sumo wrestling remains largely a niche sport outside of Japan. However, with the success of wrestlers from Mongolia and other countries, it is possible that the sport may continue to grow in popularity in the future.

Prize Money in Sumo

Sumo wrestling is a sport that is steeped in tradition, and this extends to the prize money that is awarded to wrestlers. Prize money is an important part of sumo wrestling, and it is a way for wrestlers to earn a living. In this section, we will take a closer look at the prize money system in sumo wrestling.

The prize money for each sumo tournament is split among the wrestlers based on their performance. The winner of the tournament receives the largest share of the prize money, while the other wrestlers receive a smaller share. The amount of prize money awarded to each wrestler depends on their rank and their performance in the tournament.

The Japan Sumo Association takes a percentage of the prize money as its charge, which is used to cover the costs of running the tournaments. The remaining prize money is then distributed among the wrestlers. The amount of prize money that is awarded to the wrestlers has increased over the years, and it is now a significant amount.

The highest-paid rank in sumo wrestling is Yokozuna, who receives an annual salary of 2.8 million yen (approximately $20,505.38). The lowest-paid rank is Basho, who earns 150 thousand yen (approximately $1,090.7) per year. The amount of prize money that is awarded to each wrestler also depends on their performance in the tournament. Wrestlers who win more matches and perform better in the tournament will receive a larger share of the prize money.

In conclusion, prize money is an important part of sumo wrestling, and it is a way for wrestlers to earn a living. The amount of prize money that is awarded to each wrestler depends on their rank and their performance in the tournament. The Japan Sumo Association takes a percentage of the prize money as its charge, and the remaining prize money is then distributed among the wrestlers.

Exhibition Tournaments and Sumo Events

In addition to the six official sumo tournaments held each year, there are also various exhibition tournaments and other sumo events that take place throughout Japan. These events offer visitors a chance to experience sumo wrestling outside of the official tournaments and can be a great way to get a taste of the sport.

Exhibition tournaments, known as “Jungyo,” are held during the off-season and feature many of the same wrestlers who compete in the official tournaments. These events are usually held in smaller venues and are more relaxed than the official tournaments, with wrestlers often interacting with the audience and engaging in more lighthearted bouts.

Other sumo events include training sessions, known as “Keiko,” which offer visitors a chance to see the wrestlers in action during their daily practice routines. These sessions are usually held early in the morning and can be a great way to see the wrestlers up close and personal.

There are also various cultural events and festivals that feature sumo wrestling, such as the annual Nada no Kenka Matsuri in Himeji, which includes a sumo tournament as part of its festivities.

Visitors who are interested in attending these events should check local event listings and tourist information centres for details. It is important to note that tickets for these events can be harder to come by than for the official tournaments, so it is recommended to book in advance where possible.

Overall, exhibition tournaments and other sumo events offer visitors a unique and exciting way to experience sumo wrestling in Japan.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can you bet on sumo wrestling?

Yes, you can bet on sumo wrestling, but it’s important to note that the legality and availability of such betting activities vary by jurisdiction. In Japan, where sumo wrestling originates, gambling on the sport is illegal. However, in other countries, particularly those where sports betting is a regulated industry, you may find licensed bookmakers offering odds on sumo wrestling matches. Online sports betting platforms may also provide options for wagering on this traditional Japanese sport.

If you’re interested in betting on sumo wrestling, it’s crucial to familiarise yourself with the sport’s rules, the ranking of the wrestlers (rikishi), and the various elements that can influence the outcome of a bout. This knowledge will help you make more informed bets. Additionally, always ensure that you are betting through a reputable and licensed bookmaker to ensure fair play and secure transactions.

Before placing any bets, it’s advisable to check the laws and regulations concerning sports betting in your jurisdiction. Some places have strict rules about online gambling, and you could face legal repercussions if you’re not careful.

Where can I bet on Sumo wrestling online?

If you’re keen on betting on sumo wrestling, there are several online platforms where you can place your bets. One notable option is 1xBet, a global betting site that offers a wide range of sports, including sumo wrestling. Marathon Bet and Netbet are also reputable platforms that provide betting options for this traditional Japanese sport.  Additional options include Unibet Sportsbook and BET CHANNEL.

What is the history of Sumo wrestling in Japan?

Sumo wrestling has a long and rich history in Japan, dating back over 1,500 years. It is believed to have originated as a form of ritualistic Shinto dance to entertain the gods and ensure a good harvest. Over time, it evolved into a full-contact sport with a complex set of rules and traditions.

Who are some of the most famous Sumo wrestlers in history?

There have been many legendary Sumo wrestlers throughout history, but a few stand out as particularly noteworthy. One of the most famous is Taiho, who won a record 32 championships in the 1960s and 70s. Other notable wrestlers include Chiyonofuji, who won 31 championships in the 1980s and 90s, and Hakuho, who has won 44 championships as of 2023.

What is the diet of a Sumo wrestler and how does it contribute to their size?

Sumo wrestlers follow a strict diet that is high in calories and protein. They typically eat two large meals a day, consisting of chankonabe, a stew made with meat, fish, and vegetables. They also consume large quantities of rice, eggs, and beer. This diet, combined with their intense training regimen, helps wrestlers to build and maintain their massive size.

How many hours a day do Sumo wrestlers typically train?

Sumo wrestlers train for several hours a day, six days a week. Their training regimen includes a combination of strength training, endurance exercises, and practice bouts. They also spend time practicing their technique and studying their opponents.

What are some important Sumo terms and their meanings?

There are many important terms and phrases in Sumo wrestling, but a few of the most common include:

  • Yokozuna: the highest rank in Sumo wrestling
  • Dohyo: the Sumo wrestling ring
  • Mawashi: the loincloth worn by Sumo wrestlers during matches
  • Shiko: a leg-strengthening exercise performed by Sumo wrestlers before matches
  • Hatakikomi: a technique in which a wrestler uses a slap to knock their opponent off balance

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BSP Profits

111 Winners Since January 2023
Total Profit:£3,261.57

£203.85

Per Month

30.92%

Win Rate

36.34%

ROI

£191.22

This Month

In Form

Premier Greyhound Tips

1,083 Winners Since October 2014
Total Profit:£34,732.60

£304.67

Per Month

27.33%

Win Rate

13.31%

ROI

£387.50

This Month

In Form

Systematic Betting

448 Winners Since September 2022
Total Profit:£2,044.52

£97.36

Per Month

38.94%

Win Rate

4.57%

ROI

£983.50

This Month